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2 edition of Intravenous versus oral rehydration during a brief period found in the catalog.

Intravenous versus oral rehydration during a brief period

Douglas J. Casa

Intravenous versus oral rehydration during a brief period

responses to subsequent exercise in the heat

by Douglas J. Casa

  • 383 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Taken from Medicine and science in sports and exercise, vol.29, 2000, pp.124-133.

StatementDouglas J. Casa...[et al,].
SeriesMedicine and science in sports and exercise -- v32, no.1
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15554246M


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Intravenous versus oral rehydration during a brief period by Douglas J. Casa Download PDF EPUB FB2

Plasma Na + increases as a result of hypotonic sweat loss during dehydration ().Because PV is restored more quickly intravenously versus orally (with % Na +) over a min rehydration period, subsequent plasma Na + levels are lower with IV versus oral rehydration ().A min rehydration time period results in similar plasma Na + levels between modes ().

Intravenous versus Oral Rehydration in Athletes Article Literature Review (PDF Available) in Sports Medicine 40(4) April with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Oral rehydration versus intravenous therapy for treating dehydration due to gastroenteritis in children: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. Steven Bellemare, 1 Lisa Hartling, 1 Natasha Wiebe, 1 Kelly Russell, 1 William R Craig, 1 Don McConnell, 1 and Terry P Klassen 1Cited by:   Background Physicians report several barriers to the use of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) for dehydration in children due to acute gastroenteritis.

Objectives To compare ORT with intravenous therapy for the treatment of moderate dehydration in children with acute gastroenteritis and to determine whether the factors reported as barriers to the use of ORT would be substantiated in by: The purpose of this study was to determine if intravenous fluid rehydration, versus oral rehydration, during a brief period (20 min) differentially affects plasma ACTH, cortisol, and.

Avoid instituting intravenous (IV) fluids before doing a trial of oral rehydration therapy in uncomplicated emergency department cases of mild to moderate dehydration in children.

Although oral rehydration therapy (ORT) was first introduced inits use declined because of reports of multiple cases of hypernatremia due to the use of oral rehydration solution (ORS) with inappropriately high carbohydrate levels.

Intravenous vs. oral rehydration: effects on subsequent exercise-heat stress. Appl. Physiol. 82(3): –, —This study compared the Intravenous versus oral rehydration during a brief period book of intravenous vs. oral rehydration after exercise-induced dehydration during a subsequent min exercise bout.

It was hypothesized that cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and hormonal Cited by:   Fluid is typically administered via intravenous (IV) infusion to athletes who develop clinical symptoms of heat illness, based on the perception that dehydration is a primary factor contributing to the condition.

However, other athletes also voluntarily rehydrate with IV fluid as opposed to, or in conjunction with, oral rehydration. The voluntary use of IV fluids to Intravenous versus oral rehydration during a brief period book rehydration in Cited by: Oral versus intravenous rehydration therapy in severe gastroenteritis.

The oral rehydration therapy was divided into two phases--a rehydration phase that used high sodium isotonic fluid at 40 ml/kg per hour and a maintenance phase using low sodium isotonic fluid (sod potass bicarbon chlor and dextrose mmol/lCited by: During exercise, the.

Blood plasma (the liquid part of our blood) and other blood-pumping values were about the same for IV and oral rehydration. Temperatures were lower with oral rehydration.

Feeling of thirst was lower in the oral rehydration group. Feelings of. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 32, No. 1, pp. –, Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess whether a brief period (20 min) of intravenous (IV) fluid rehydration versus oral rehydration differentially affects cardiovascular, thermoreg- ulatory, and performance factors during exhaustive exercise in the heat.

Despite treatment recommendations from various organizations, oral rehydration therapy (ORT) continues to be underused, particularly by physicians in high-income countries. We conducted a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to compare ORT and intravenous therapy (IVT) for the treatment of dehydration secondary to acute gastroenteritis in by:   Rehydration is the cornerstone of treatment for cholera.

Oral rehydration salts and, when necessary, intravenous fluids and electrolytes, if administered in a timely manner and in adequate volumes, will reduce fatalities to well under 1% of all patients. Patients with severe acute malnutrition should receive oral rehydration with low-osmolarity.

Oral Dosage Forms ORAL REHYDRATION SALTS (FOR ORAL SOLUTION) USP Usual adult and adolescent dose Rehydration Mild dehydration: Oral, initially 50 mL of solution per kg of body weight over four to six {25} hours, the amounts and rates being adjusted as needed and tolerated, depending on thirst and response to therapy.

{02} {07} {21} Moderate dehydration: Oral, initially mL of solution per. Miriam Laufer, George Siberry, in Comprehensive Pediatric Hospital Medicine, Treatment. Oral rehydration therapy is the mainstay of management of children with mild to moderate dehydration.

Intravenous fluids are appropriate for children who are severely dehydrated, are moderately dehydrated with persistent vomiting, or have an underlying condition that can be exacerbated by dehydration. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) is a type of fluid replacement used to prevent and treat dehydration, especially that due to diarrhea.

It involves drinking water with modest amounts of sugar and salts, specifically sodium and potassium. Oral rehydration therapy can also be given by a nasogastric tube. Therapy should routinely include the use of zinc ine: treatment. Oral rehydration therapy has been studied for nearly 60 years.

It has been shown to reduce mortality from diarrheal illnesses by 93% 3 and to reduce the case fatality rate of cholera from 30% to 1 Cited by: 9. OBJECTIVE--To determine the effectiveness of oral rehydration in children with moderate dehydration caused by gastroenteritis, and to compare the complications of oral and intravenous treatment.

DESIGN--Randomised controlled trial. SETTING--Emergency department and infectious diseases ward in a large urban teaching hospital. PATIENTS children aged months who Cited by:   Subcutaneous Rehydration Compared to Intravenous Rehydration (PEDs-II) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators.

Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Fluid replacement or fluid resuscitation is the medical practice of replenishing bodily fluid lost through sweating, bleeding, fluid shifts or other pathologic processes.

Fluids can be replaced with oral rehydration therapy (drinking), intravenous therapy, rectally such as with a Murphy drip, or by hypodermoclysis, the direct injection of fluid into the subcutaneous tissue.

Although oral rehydration therapy (ORT) is recommended as the best treatment for mild-to-moderate dehydration by the AAP and the World Health Organization, many hospital emergency department (ED) providers still use intravenous fluid (IVF) therapy, presumably because they believe it is expected and less : Harlan R.

Gephart. Language. English; Citation for previous publication. Hartling L, Bellemare S, Wiebe N, Russell KF, Klassen TP, Craig WR.

Oral versus intravenous rehydration for Cited by: Comparison of Sports Drink Versus Oral Rehydration Solution During Exercise in the Heat. and oral rehydration solutions (ORS) not only enhances palatability and fluid retention but also stimulates the drive to drink.9, 10, A treatment difference was not significant until after exercise during the min rest period Cited by: 1.

Oral Versus Intravenous Rehydration for Prevention of Dehydration in Premature Babies, During the First Days of Life. (SROPREMA) The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. INTRAVENOUS FLUIDS & ORAL REHYDRATION SOLUTION.

LEARNING OUTCOMES. Intravenous infusion of an isotonic solution of sodium chloride will expand only the extracellular compartment. Remain in the intravascular space for only a short period before diffusing across the capillary wall into the interstitial space.

TY - JOUR. T1 - Oral versus intravenous rehydration of moderately dehydrated children [3] AU - Greenough, William B. PY - /6/1. Y1 - /6/1Cited by: 1. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT), treatment consisting of a salt-and-sugar-based solution taken orally to treat dehydration from diarrhea.

The salts can be prepackaged and typically include a combination of sodium, glucose, potassium, and citrate to be mixed with clean water. Oral rehydration therapy. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) encompasses two phases of treatment: a) the rehydration phase, in which water and electrolytes are given as oral rehydration solution (ORS) to replace existing losses, and b) the maintenance phase, which includes both replacement of ongoing fluid and electrolyte losses and adequate dietary intake (7).

Intravenous (IV) rehydration is a treatment for fluid loss in which a sterile water solution containing small amounts of salt or sugar is injected into the patient's bloodstream. Purpose Rehydration is usually performed to treat the symptoms associated with dehydration, or excessive loss of body water.

*Repeat once if radial pulse is still very weak or not detectable. Reassess the patient every hours and continue hydrating. If hydration is not improving, give the IV drip more rapidly. ml/kg or more may be needed during the first 24 hours of treatment. give age appropriate diet along with oral fluids that contain sodium, potassium, sugar, and sodium bicarbonate.

The electrolyte present in the most abundance in gastric digestive fluids is. For osmosis to occur there must be. a semipermeable membrane.

A shared function of plasma proteins, glucose, electrolytes, and sodium is. The History of Oral Rehydration Therapy. Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) – heralded by the medical community as one of the most critical medical advances of the 20th century – was discovered through a series of medical breakthroughs beginning in the s.

doctors believed intravenous fluids were the only way to combat dehydration from. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Oral rehydration therapy, (also called ORT, oral rehydration salts or solutions (ORS), or oral electrolyte), is a simple, cheap, and effective treatment for diarrhea-related dehydration, caused by e.g.

consists of a solution of salts and other substances such as glucose, sucrose, citrates or molasses, which is administered orally. In many countries, patients are generally allowed to have clear fluids until 2–3 h before surgery.

In Japan, long preoperative fasting is still common practice. To shorten the preoperative fasting period in Japan, we tested the safety and efficacy of oral rehydration therapy until 2 h before surgery. Three hundred low-risk patients scheduled for morning surgery in six university-affiliated Cited by:   DHAKA, Bangladesh — In the last 30 years, oral rehydration solution (ORS) — a blend of salt, sugar, and clean water — has saved an estimated 50 million lives worldwide, especially children.

Oral fluid therapy is effective, safe, convenient, and inexpensive compared with IV therapy. Oral fluid therapy is recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the WHO and should be used for children with mild to moderate dehydration who are accepting fluids orally unless prohibited by copious vomiting or underlying disorders (eg, surgical abdomen, intestinal obstruction).

Vesikari et al. conducted a randomized trial of rapid oral versus intravenous rehydration 37 infants under 5 years of age with dehydration were randomly assigned to either an oral rehydration regimen or IV fluid regimen aimed at replacing the estimated deficit over 12 hours.

These findings have implications for addressing one of the major barriers to the use of oral rehydration therapy in the ED setting. PMID: Full article available for purchase. Oral rehydration of infants in a large urban U.S. medical center. Tamer AM, Friedman LB, Maxwell SR, Cynamon HA, Perez HN, Cleveland WW.

Journal of. Oral rehydration therapy is preferred over intravenous therapy for fluid replacement caused by diarrhea because it a. is quicker. tastes better. is just as effective. provides electrolytes as well as fluid. Fluids calculated for intravenous administration.

Alternately, Oral Rehydration Therapy fluids might be delivered by nasogastric tube. Oral rehydration therapy was created within the forties but didn't arrive Oral Rehydration Therapy into popular use right until the nineteen seventies.[four] Oral rehydration Resolution is on the entire world well being Business's List of crucial Medicines, the.Oral rehydration therapy (ORT) involves the replacement of fluids and electrolytes lost during an episode of diarrheal illness.

Diarrheal illnesses are pervasive worldwide, and they have a particularly large impact in the developing world. Children under the age of five are the major victims and.Oral rehydration therapy is preferred over intravenous therapy for fluid from PSCYCHOLOG at Brooklyn College, CUNY C Oral hydration is preferred over intravenous therapy if the fluid can be consumed by the patient because it is just as effective as intravenous therapy, Chapter Nutrition during Pregnancy and